My Blog

By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
November 14, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: oral health   diabetes  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutDiabetesandOralHealth

People with diabetes have special concerns when it comes to dental care. In fact, 1 in every 5 cases of total tooth loss is linked to this widespread health condition. November is National Diabetes month, so it’s a good opportunity for us to answer some frequently asked questions about oral health and diabetes.

Q. Can I get a dental implant to replace a missing tooth even if I have diabetes?

A number of studies have shown that people with diabetes can be good candidates for dental implants, but there are some concerns regarding dental implant treatment, which involves minor surgery. Wounds tend to heal more slowly in people with diabetes, who are also more infection-prone than those without diabetes. In diabetic individuals with poor glucose control, research has also shown that it takes longer for the bone to heal after implant placement. We will take these (and other) factors into account when planning your implant treatment. However, in many situations even poorly controlled diabetes does not necessarily preclude dental implant treatment.

Q. I’ve heard people with diabetes have a higher risk for gum disease. Is that true?

Yes. Research shows that people with diabetes are more susceptible to periodontal (gum) disease, especially when their diabetes is poorly controlled. The reverse is also true: untreated periodontal disease can worsen blood sugar levels. So it’s important to manage both of these inflammatory conditions. If you notice the early signs of gum disease, such as inflamed or bleeding gums, please bring this to our attention. Early gum disease (gingivitis) is much easier to treat than more advanced forms—which can eventually lead to tooth loss.

Q. If I have diabetes, how can I protect my oral health?

Keep doing your best to control your blood sugar levels with exercise and a healthy diet—and stick to an effective daily oral hygiene routine, which includes both brushing and flossing and coming in for regular dental checkups and cleanings. Make sure to let us know what medications you are taking and update us on any changes. If you notice any mouth sores, swelling or inflammation, bring this to our attention as soon as possible.

If you have additional questions about diabetes and oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
October 30, 2017
Category: Oral Health
MayimBialiksHalloweenFairyHelpsKeepHerKidsTeethCavity-Free

Halloween is great fun for kids… but maybe not so much fun for their teeth. Is there a way for this much-anticipated holiday to be less stressful to oral health? Actress Mayim Bialik of The Big Bang Theory thinks so! In an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, the mother of two young sons said, “We don't do candy for Halloween. We have a Halloween fairy who takes it all away, and they get to choose a small LEGO toy in its place.”

Though this may not work for every family, it’s definitely an idea worth considering. After all, depending on how much candy your kids take in from trick-or-treating, they may have a supply that lasts for days or even weeks — and a steady diet of sticky sweets is just what their teeth don’t need.

Why is candy so bad for teeth? Disease-causing oral bacteria feed on the sugars in the candy. In the process of breaking down the sugar, the bacteria produce acids that start to break down the protective enamel covering of teeth — forming small holes, or cavities. This allows the bacteria to get deeper inside the tooth, increasing the size of the cavity. While this can happen with any food that contains sugar, the stickiness of many candies make them harder to clean off the teeth — essentially giving the bacteria more time to do their damage.

Is there anything that can be done — short of the candy exchange Mayim Bialik has managed to implement in her house? Nothing that would be as effective as eliminating candy altogether as Mayim has done, but there are a few ways to reduce the potential for harm. For example, you can try to weed out the stickiest candies, like taffy, and hard candies that stay in the mouth a long time. You can make sure your kids eat them only as a dessert at mealtime, and not throughout the day. And you can pay extra attention to how good a job your kids are doing with their daily oral hygiene. They should be brushing twice a day and flossing at least once each day. Drinking some water after eating a piece of candy can also be helpful.

It’s also important to keep up a regular schedule of routine dental visits. So if it’s been a while since your kids have been in for a checkup and cleaning, please contact us to schedule an appointment. You can learn more about kids’ oral health by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dentistry and Oral Health for Children.” And Dear Doctor’s full interview with Mayim Bialik is available here.

By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
October 22, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth pain  
WhyYourTeethHurtWillDetermineHowWeTreatThem

Your teeth and gums have a highly sensitive network of nerves. But while it can signal even the most subtle discomfort we may not be able to identify the cause with pinpoint accuracy. As a result, tooth pain could indicate more than one kind of problem including a decayed tooth, root sensitivity, infected gum tissues (like an abscess) or a dying pulp signaled by diseased nerve tissue inside the tooth.

On the other hand, not all tooth pain is the same: it can be dull or sharp, continuous or intermittent. It can feel like a constant, throbbing ache or a sharp wince when you eat or drink something cold or hot, or when you bite down. These differences could point our diagnostic examination in the right direction.

For example, sharp, throbbing pain could indicate deep tooth decay, especially if it suddenly stops. That would likely mean the nerves within the tooth pulp under attack by the infection have died and can no longer transmit pain. The infection, on the other hand is still very much active — this usually requires a root canal treatment (cleaning out the pulp and root canals of diseased and dead tissue and filling the empty spaces) if we’re to save the tooth.

If, however, you’re experiencing sensitivity from temperature or pressure, we could be facing at least a couple of scenarios. For one, your tooth could be fractured. More likely, though, periodontal (gum) disease triggered by bacterial plaque has caused the gum tissues to shrink back (recede) from the affected teeth so that the sensitive dentin layer is exposed and no longer protected by the gum tissue.

If we diagnose gum disease, we’ll need to aggressively remove bacterial plaque from all tooth and gum surfaces. This procedure might require more than one appointment and the possibility of surgery if we encounter deep pockets of infection, especially around the roots. If gum recession is severe you may also need grafting surgery to replace the missing gum tissue or to re-cover the exposed areas of your teeth.

So, knowing the source of tooth pain will direct the course of treatment to follow. With proper treatment, though, the chances are good we can not only restore your teeth and gums to optimum health but we can end the pain.

If you would like more information on treating tooth pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Confusing Tooth Pain.”

Happy Monday, Streamwood Smiles family! Dr. Schneider and I are happy to announce that we will be creating blog posts to address some of our most commonly asked dental questions, as well as keep you all up-to-date with the most recent advances in dentistry.

In today's post, I'll be addressing a topic that most patients encounter at least once in their dental lives: the use of antibiotics in dentistry. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed throughout the medical and dental world; I would be willing to bet that everyone reading this post has been prescribed an antibiotic in their lives. They have been an incredibly important advance in medicine, and access to antibiotics is one of the most prominent reasons that life expectancy has increased in developed nations.

However as the rate of antibiotic prescription increased, so did our knowledge of some of the drawbacks to using these "superdrugs" to treat every small infection. One of these drawbacks is a concept called antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is the concept that the bacteria we are fighting with our antibiotics are living organisms, too. Bacteria are subject to all of nature's rules for living things, including that of natural selection. Antibiotics kill off the bacteria that are too weak to fight them off; in most cases, all of them. However, there are certain situations where a bacterium has adapted to be resistant to a certain antibiotic or family of antibiotics. In these situations, these bacteria continue to live when presented with an antibiotic, multiply, and the infection is not treated effectively. Sometimes these antibiotic resistant infections can have deadly consequences.

Another potential risk to over-prescribing antibiotics are superbug infections, such as infection with Clostridium difficile, known as C diff for short in the medical community. According to Dentistry Today: “Antibiotics kill both good and bad bacteria in the gastrointestinal system. Wiping out protective bacteria can allow the growth of C diff, leading to severe and potentially deadly diarrhea.” Taking even one course of antibiotics can cause infection with C diff or other bacterial Superbugs, including the commonly prescribed antibiotic clindamycin.

While these facts about antibiotics can be frightening, there are still situations in which antibiotic prescription is warranted in the dental office. For example, if your dentist sees an abscess (an area of infection associated with a tooth), then he/she will likely prescribe an antibiotic. The key to preventing the negative consequences of over-prescription of antibiotics is patient and doctor education. At Streamwood Smiles, we are committed to arming ourselves with the most up-to-date information and recommendations regarding antibiotic prescription as well as  to continue to educate our patients with this information. Understanding that antibiotics are not the answer for all dental situations, and that your dentists are educated to prescribe antibiotics only when necessary, will help you to own your dental health in the future.

We appreciate your commitment to your dental health, and look forward to seeing you soon!

  • Dr. Caitlin Wehrle, DMD
By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
October 07, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
YourNewImplantsNeedProperHygieneJustasMuchasyourOtherTeeth

So, you’ve just acquired an attractive restoration with dental implants. You may be thinking at least with these teeth you won’t have to worry about dental disease.

Think again. While the implants and their porcelain crowns are impervious to decay the surrounding gums and bone are still vulnerable to infection. In fact, you could be at risk for a specific type of periodontal (gum) disease called peri-implantitis (inflammation around the implant).

Bacterial plaque, the thin bio-film most responsible for gum disease, can build up on implant crowns just as it does on natural tooth surfaces. If it isn’t removed with daily brushing and flossing and regular dental cleanings the bacteria can trigger an infection in the gums.

Besides weakening gum tissues, gum disease can also cause bone loss, of critical importance to dental implants. An implant depends on the bone they’re inserted in to hold them in place. If the bone around an implant becomes infected it could begin to be lost or dissolve (resorb), which could lead to loss of the implant.

That’s why it’s critical to keep the natural tissue structures supporting your implants infection-free. Not only is daily hygiene a must, but your implants and any remaining natural teeth should undergo professional cleaning at least twice a year or more if your dentist recommends it.

Cleanings involving implants will also be a bit different from natural teeth. While the dental materials used in the crown and implant post are quite durable, regular cleaning instruments can scratch them. Although tiny, these scratches can become hiding places for bacteria and increase your risk of infection.

To avoid this, your hygienist will use instruments (known as scalers and curettes) usually made of plastics or resins rather than metal. The hygienist may still use metal instruments on your remaining natural teeth because their enamel can tolerate metal without becoming scratched creating a smoother surface.

While keeping implants clean can sometimes be a challenge, it’s not impossible. Implants on average have a long-term success rate above 95%. With both you and your dentist caring and maintaining these state-of-the-art restorations, you may be able to enjoy them for decades.

If you would like more information on caring for dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance: Implant Teeth must be Cleaned Differently.”





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