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Posts for: September, 2019

TopicalFluorideOffersaProtectiveBoosttoChildrenatHighRiskforDecay

You're doing all the right things helping your child avoid tooth decay: daily brushing and flossing, regular dental visits and a low-sugar diet. But although occurrences are low, they're still getting cavities.

Some children still struggle with tooth decay even with proper dental care. If this is happening to your child, your dentist may be able to give them an extra preventive boost through topical fluoride.

Fluoride has long been recognized as a proven cavity fighter. Often added in small amounts to toothpastes and drinking water, fluoride strengthens tooth enamel against acid attacks that create cavities. With topical fluoride, a dentist applies a varnish, foam or gel containing a more concentrated amount of the chemical directly to the teeth.

The effectiveness of this method in reducing tooth decay is well-founded: A number of scientific studies involving thousands of children and adolescents found an average 28% reduction in occurrences of decay among those who received the treatment compared to those who didn't.

Still, many parents have concerns about the higher fluoride concentrations in topical applications. But even at this greater amount, fluoride doesn't appear to pose any long-term health risks. The most adverse effects—vomiting, headaches or stomach pain—usually occur if a child accidentally ingests too much of the solution during treatment.

Dentists, however, go to great lengths to prevent this by using guards to isolate the solution during an application. And in the case of a foam or gel application, parents can further lower the risk of these unpleasant side effects by not allowing their child to eat or drink for at least thirty minutes after the procedure.

The evidence seems to indicate that the benefits of regular topical fluoride applications for children at high risk outweigh the possible side effects. By adding this measure to your prevention strategy, you can further protect your child from this danger to their current and future dental health.

If you would like more information on tooth decay prevention for your child, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride Gels Reduce Decay.”


By Christopher L. Schneider, DMD
September 16, 2019
Category: Antibiotics

Happy Monday Streamwood Smiles Family!  We are happy to announce that we will be creating blog posts to address some of our most commonly asked dental questions, as well as keep you up-to-date with the most recent advances in dentistry.

In today's post, we are addressing a topic that most patients encounter at least once in their dental lives: the use of antibiotics in dentistry.  Antibiotics are commonly prescribed throughout the medical and dental world; probably everyone reading this post has been prescribed an antibiotic in their lives.  They have been an incredibly important advance in medicine, and access to antibiotics is one of the most prominent reasons that life expectancy has increased in developed nations.

However as the rate of antibiotic prescription increased, so did our knowledge of some of the drawbacks to using these "superdrugs" to treat every small infection.  One of these drawbacks is a concept called antibiotic resistance.  Antibiotic resistance is the concept that the bacteria we are fighting with our antibiotics are living organisms, too.  Bacteria are subject to all of nature's rules for living things, including that of natural selection.  Antibiotics kill off the bacteria that are too weak to fight them off; in most cases, all of them.  However, there are certain situations where a bacterium has adapted to be resistant to a certain antibiotic or family of antibiotics.  In these situations, these bacteria continue to live when presented with an antibiotic, multiply, and the infection is not treated effectively.  Sometimes these antibiotic resistant infections can have deadly consequences.

Another potential risk to over-prescribing antibiotics are superbug infections, such as infection with Clostridium difficile, known as C diff for short in the medical community.  According to Dentistry Today: "Antibiotics kill both good and bad bacteria in the gastrointestinal system.  Wiping our protective bacteria can allow growth of C diff, leading to severe and potentially deadly diarrhea."  Taking even one course of antibiotics can cause infection with C diff or other bacterial Superbugs, including the commonly prescribed antiobiotic clindamycin.

While these facts about antibiotics can be frightening, there are still situations in which antibiotic prescription is warranted in the dental office.  For example, if your dentist sees an abcess (an area of infection associated with a tooth), then he/she will likely prescribe an antibiotic.  The key to preventing the negative consequences of over-prescription of antibiotics is patient and doctor education.  At Streamwood Smiles, we are committed to arming ourselves with the most up-to-date information and recommendations regarding antibiotic prescription as well as to continue to educate our patients with this information.  Understanding that antibiotics are not the answer for all dental situations, and that your dentists are educated to prescribe antibiotics only when necessary, will help you to own your dental health in the future.

We appreciate your commitment to your dental health, and look forward to seeing you soon!

---Your dental team at Streamwood Smiles Dental Care

 


By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
September 16, 2019
Category: Oral Health
NancyODellonMakingOralHygieneFunforKids

When Entertainment Tonight host Nancy O’Dell set out to teach her young daughter Ashby how to brush her teeth, she knew the surest path to success would be to make it fun for the toddler.

“The best thing with kids is you have to make everything a game,” Nancy recently said in an interview with Dear Doctor TV. She bought Ashby a timer in the shape of a tooth that ticks for two minutes — the recommended amount of time that should be spent on brushing — and the little girl loved it. “She thought that was super fun, that she would turn the timer on and she would brush her teeth for that long,” Nancy said.

Ashby was also treated to a shopping trip for oral-hygiene supplies with Mom. “She got to go with me and choose the toothpaste that she wanted,” Nancy recalled. “They had some SpongeBob toothpaste that she really liked, so we made it into a fun activity.”

Seems like this savvy mom is on to something! Just because good oral hygiene is a must for your child’s health and dental development, that doesn’t mean it has to feel like a chore. Equally important to making oral-hygiene instruction fun is that it start as early as possible. It’s best to begin cleaning your child’s teeth as soon as they start to appear in infancy. Use a small, soft-bristled, child-sized brush or a clean, damp washcloth and just a thin smear of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice.

Once your child is old enough to hold the toothbrush and understand what the goal is, you can let him or her have a turn at brushing; but make sure you also take your turn, so that every tooth gets brushed — front, back and all chewing surfaces. After your child turns 3 and is capable of spitting out the toothpaste, you can increase the toothpaste amount to the size of a pea. Kids can usually take over the task of brushing by themselves around age 6, but may still need help with flossing.

Another great way to teach your children the best oral-hygiene practices is to model them yourself. If you brush and floss every day, and have regular cleanings and exams at the dental office, your child will come to understand what a normal, healthy and important routine this is. Ashby will certainly get this message from her mom.

“I’m very adamant about seeing the dentist regularly,” Nancy O’Dell said in her Dear Doctor interview. “I make sure that I go when I’m supposed to go.”

It’s no wonder that Nancy has such a beautiful, healthy-looking smile. And from the looks of things, her daughter is on track to have one, too. We would like to see every child get off to an equally good start!

If you have questions about your child’s oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Taking the Stress Out of Dentistry for Kids” and “Top 10 Oral Health Tips for Children.”


By Dr. Schneider Dental Care
September 06, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
DespiteSomeOnlineSourcesRootCanalsDontCauseDisease

The internet has transformed how we get information. Where you once needed to find an encyclopedia, telephone directory or library, you can now turn to your handy smartphone or tablet for the same information.

But this convenience has a dark side: A lot of material online hasn’t undergone the rigorous proofreading and editing published references of yesteryear once required. It’s much easier now to encounter misinformation—and accepting some of it as true could harm your health. To paraphrase the old warning to buyers: “Viewer beware.”

You may already have encountered one such example of online misinformation: the notion that undergoing a root canal treatment causes cancer. While it may sound like the figment of some prankster’s imagination, the idea actually has a historical basis.

In the early 20th Century, a dentist named Weston Price theorized that leaving a dead anatomical part in the body led to disease or major health problems. In Price’s view, this included a tooth that had undergone a root canal treatment: With the vital pulp removed, the tooth was, in his view, “dead.”

Price amassed enough of a following that the American Dental Association rigorously investigated his claims in the 1950s and found them thoroughly wanting. For good measure, a Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery) published a study in 2013 finding that not only did canal treatments not increase cancer, but they might even be responsible for decreasing the risk by as much as forty-five percent.

Here’s one sure fact about root canal treatments—they can save a tooth that might otherwise be lost. Once decay has infiltrated the inner pulp of a tooth, it’s only a matter of time before it spreads through the root canals to the bone. Removing the infected pulp tissue and filling the resulting empty space and root canals gives the tooth a new lease on life.

So, be careful with health advice promoted on the internet. Instead, talk to a real authority on dental care, your dentist. If they propose a root canal treatment for you, they have your best health interest—dental and general—at heart.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Safety: The Truth About Endodontic Treatment and Your Health.”




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